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Showing 6 posts in Absolute Priority Rule.

The Supreme Court’s Answer is Simply “No”—Structured Dismissals Cannot Deviate From the Code’s Priority Rules Without Consent of Affected Creditors

Czyzewski v. Jevic Holding Corp., 580 U.S. ___ (2017)

In Official Comm. of Unsecured Creditors v. CIT Group/Business Credit, Inc. (In re Jevic Holding Corp.), 787 F.3d 173 (3d Cir. May 21, 2015), the Third Circuit Court of Appeals examined structured dismissals and whether the distributions provided for therein can deviate from the Bankruptcy Code’s priority distribution scheme.  It held that they could but only in the “rare case.”  Almost two years later, the Supreme Court has weighed in on the issue, disagreeing with the Third Circuit and holding that a bankruptcy court cannot approve a structured dismissal that provides for distributions deviating from the ordinary priority rules established by the Bankruptcy Code without affected creditors’ consent.  Op. at 11. Read More ›

Insider’s Scoop: Judge Sontchi’s Decision to Confirm Horsehead’s Plan Was One of His Honor’s Most Difficult and Closest Calls in Ten Years on the Bench

In re Horsehead Holding Corp., No. 16-10287 (CSS) (Bankr. D. Del. Sept. 2, 2016) [Transcript Ruling]

Following a three day confirmation trial, which attracted scores of shareholders and running commentary via live tweets from the courtroom, Judge Sontchi confirmed the second amended plan of reorganization (the “Plan”) proposed by Horsehead Holding Corp. and its affiliated debtors (“Horsehead”) over the objection of the official committee of equity holders (the “Equity Committee”), holding that the Plan was proposed in good faith and satisfied the absolute priority rule.  His Honor described the decision as one of the most difficult and closest calls that he has had to make during his time on the bench. Read More ›

Third Circuit Allows 363 Purchaser’s Funds to Bypass IRS and Satisfy Certain Administrative and General Unsecured Claims

In re ICL Holding Company, Inc., No. 14-2709, 2015 WL 5315604 (3d Cir. Sept. 14, 2015), aff’g sub nom United States v. LCI Holding Co., Inc., Nos. 13-924 (SLR), 13-1188 (SLR), 2014 WL 975145 (D. Del. March 10, 2014)

As discussed by the Delaware Bankruptcy Insider in March of last year, in ruling on a motion for stay the Delaware District Court determined that the Delaware Bankruptcy Court did not err when it approved a sale of substantially all of the assets of LCI Holding Company, Inc. and its affiliated debtors (the “Debtors”) and a settlement between the purchaser (the Debtors’ prepetition senior lender), the official committee of unsecured creditors, and the Debtors that (a) provided for the creation of an escrow from non-estate purchaser funds to, among other things, satisfy certain fees and expenses of professionals and certain expenses expected to be incurred by the Debtors in connection with their wind down and provide a distribution to allowed general unsecured claims and noteholder claims and (b) excluded the Internal Revenue Service (the “IRS”) from those creditors entitled to share in the escrowed funds.  The IRS, which asserted an administrative claim for tax liability resulting from the sale, appealed the approval of the sale and settlement to the Third Circuit Court of Appeals asserting that the sale and settlement violated the absolute priority rule by favoring creditors with an equal or lesser priority under the Bankruptcy Code’s distribution scheme.    Read More ›

Third Circuit Approves of Structured Dismissals That Deviate From the Bankruptcy Code’s Priority Scheme – But Only in Rare Cases

Official Comm. of Unsecured Creditors v. CIT Group/Business Credit, Inc. (In re Jevic Holding Corp.), No. 14-1465, 2015 WL 2403443 (3d Cir. May 21, 2015)

The Third Circuit Court of Appeals (the “Third Circuit”) answered a novel question of bankruptcy law in the affirmative—whether a chapter 11 case can ever be resolved in a “structured dismissal” (a disposition that winds up the bankruptcy with certain conditions attached instead of simply dismissing the case and restoring the status quo ante) that deviates from the priority scheme of the Bankruptcy Code.  In rare cases, the Bankruptcy Code “permits a structured dismissal, even one that deviates from the [section] 507 priorities, when a bankruptcy judge makes sound findings of fact that the traditional routes out of Chapter 11 are unavailable and that a settlement is the best feasible way of serving the interests of the estate and its creditors.”  The Third Circuit found that this was one of those rare cases. Read More ›

Debtors’ Funds Purchased in Section 363 Sale Permitted to be Disbursed to Debtors' Administrative and Unsecured Creditors Over IRS Objections

United States v. LCI Holding Co., Inc., Nos. 13-924 (SLR), 13-1188 (SLR), 2014 WL 975145 (D. Del. March 10, 2014)

On March 10, 2014, Judge Sue L. Robinson of the District Court denied the request of the United States, on behalf of the Internal Revenue Service, to stay disbursement of funds placed into escrow by a purchaser of debtor-assets intended to satisfy some but not all administrative and unsecured claims asserted against the debtors.   Simply put, the sale was appropriate under section 363 of the Bankruptcy Code and the escrowed funds were not property of the debtors' estates. Read More ›

District Court Affirms Bankruptcy Court’s Approval of a Settlement and Structured Dismissal in the Face of an Absolute Priority Challenge

Czyzewski v. Jevic Holding Corp. (In re Jevic Holding Corp.), No. 13-104 (SLR), 2014 WL 268613 (D. Del. Jan. 24, 2014)

On January 24, 2014, Judge Sue L. Robinson affirmed a Bankruptcy Court order approving a settlement and structured dismissal of the chapter 11 cases of Jevic Holding Corp. and its affiliated debtors in the face of a challenge that such settlement, among other things, violated the absolute priority rule of section 1129 of the Bankruptcy Code.  Among other things, the Court determined that the absolute priority rule did not apply to the settlement given that it was presented outside a plan of reorganization.  Moreover, even if it did apply, the appeal was equitably moot. Read More ›